The Pace of Shifting Climate in Marine and Terrestrial Ecosystems

photo of playful dolphins jumping in opposite directions in the open oceanA new study published in the journal Science found that, at certain latitudes, both the speed and direction of climate change and shifts in the seasonal timing of temperatures are changing more quickly in the ocean than on land. This may introduce conservation concerns because the more rapid changes often occur in areas of high marine diversity.

The Pace of Shifting Climate in Marine and Terrestrial Ecosystems
M.T. Burrows, D.S. Schoeman, L.B. Buckley, P. Moore, E.S. Poloczanska, K.M. Brander, C. Brown, J.F. Bruno, C.M. Duarte, B.S. Halpern, J. Holding, C.V. Kappel, W. Kiessling, M.I. O’Connor, J.M. Pandolfi, C. Parmesan, F.B. Schwing, W.J. Sydeman, A.J. Richardson
Science Vol. 334 no. 6056 pp. 652-655 (online 3 Nov 2011)
U.C. Santa Barbara press release

Following is a sample of the media coverage of this study:
The Atlantic: New Evidence That Climate Change Threatens Marine Biodiversity
ABC Australia: Climate change affecting oceans faster: Study
Times of India: Marine life 'needs to swim faster to survive climate change'
Sky News Australia: Aussie marine life climate change threat
The Australian: Marine life in climate change hot water
Softpedia: Species will have to move fast to adapt to climate change
Fish Update: Climate shifts could leave some species homeless, new research shows
Deccan Chronicle (India): Marine life 'needs to swim faster to survive climate change'
FishNewsEU.com: Climate warming poses serious conservation challenge for marine life

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Posted on November 3, 2011