NCEAS Project 12587

Plants for planting

  • Kerry O. Britton

ActivityDatesFurther Information
Working Group12th—16th July 2010Participant List  

Abstract
This working group will evaluate data availability and quality for an assessment of the costs and benefits of implementing changes to USDA Plants for Planting regulations to prevent the unintentional importation of invasive pests carried on plants into the United States.. Three scenarios will be considered: 1) status quo, in which the U.S. mainly relies on a black list system and port of entry inspections; 2) status quo plus a new category of “grey listed” plants called NAPPRA (Not Authorized for Importation Pending Pest Risk Analysis); and 3) which adds a systems approach for clean stock production to the other two mitigations. To do this, the working group will apply lessons learned as well as an econometric model developed by an associated working group (http://www.nceas.ucsb.edu/projects/12289), to better understand how changes in phytosanitary regulation lead to changes in trade flows and pest introductions. In addition the group will undertake an analysis to determine what portion of introduced forest pests likely entered via the nursery stock pathway.

TypeProducts of NCEAS Research
Presentations Britton, Kerry O. 2011. Plants for planting: How many pests, and at what price? . USDA Interagency Forum on Invasive Species. Annapolis, Maryland.
Presentations Garrett, Lynn J. 2011. Trends in live plant imports. 22nd USDA Interagency Research Forum on Invasive Species. Annapolis, Maryland.
Presentations Garrett, Lynn J. 2011. Trends in live plant imports. USDA, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Plant Protection and Quarantine.
Journal Article Liebhold, Andrew M.; Brockerhoff, Eckehard G.; Garrett, Lynn J.; Parke, Jennifer; Britton, Kerry O. 2012. Live plant imports: The major pathway for forest insect and pathogen invasions of the US. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment. Vol: 10(3). Pages 135-143. (Online version)
Data Set Liebhold, Andrew M. 2012. Live plant imports: The major pathway for forest insect and pathogen invasions of the US. (Online version)