NCEAS Project 2000

Developing the conceptual basis for restoration biology

  • Edith B. Allen
  • W. W. Covington
  • Donald A. Falk

ActivityDatesFurther Information
Workshop19th—21st April 1996Participant List  

Abstract
A workshop is proposed to improve the scientific basis for ecological restoration. The Conservation and Restoration Biology Program has had relatively few proposals submitted and funded on restoration, even though the field of restoration is growing rapidly and is in need of a stronger conceptual basis. Restoration may be considered an experimental tool for understanding the functioning of ecological systems, but the promise of the contribution restoration ecology can make has not been fulfilled. There are literally thousands of restoration projects throughout the country, with many opportunities for restoration research on already-prepared sites. However, the number of these projects in which researchers collaborate remains relatively small. The goals of the workshop are to encourage more scientists to write high quality proposals and engage in restoration research, and to involve practicing restorationists in scientific studies. A major theme is changing the emphasis in restoration from an anecdotal to a scientific approach.

A two day workshop will be organized hierarchically to discuss organismal, community, ecosystem, and landscape level issues that are particular to restoration. We propose to discuss whether there are conceptual challenges that are particular to restoration that we do not find in other areas of ecology or biology, and determine some of the underlying principles of restoration. The contributions that practicing restorationists may make to the field of restoration ecology will also be covered, and what we may learn from the many existing restoration projects that have not been monitored or studied in any depth. A special area of emphasis will be the building of partnerships between practitioners and theorists to improve practice and research in restoration. The products of the workshop will be a set of recommendations to NSF to improve the quality and quantity of proposals that are submitted, and a set of published papers that expand upon the themes discussed at the workshop.

TypeProducts of NCEAS Research
Journal Article Allen, Edith B.; Covington, W. W.; Falk, Donald A. 1996. National Science Foundation workshop supports restoration-related research. Restoration and Management Notes. Vol: 14. Pages 148-150.
Journal Article Allen, Edith B.; Covington, W. W.; Falk, Donald A. 1997. Developing the conceptual basis for restoration ecology. Restoration Ecology. Vol: 5. Pages 275-276.
Journal Article Bell, Susan; Fonseca, Mark S.; Motten, L. B. 1997. Linking restoration and landscape ecology. Restoration Ecology. Vol: 5. Pages 318-323.
Journal Article Clewell, Andy; Rieger, John. 1997. What practitioners need from restoration ecologists. Restoration Ecology. Vol: 5. Pages 350-354.
Journal Article Ehrenfeld, Joan; Toth, Lou. 1997. Restoration ecology and the ecosystem perspective. Restoration Ecology. Vol: 5. Pages 307-317.
Journal Article Montalvo, Arlee; Williams, Susan L.; Rice, Kevin; Buchmann, Stephen L.; Cory, Coleen; Handel, Steve; Nabhan, G.; Robichaux, Rob. 1997. Restoration biology: A population biology perspective. Restoration Ecology. Vol: 5. Pages 277-290.
Journal Article Palmer, Margaret A.; Ambrose, Richard F.; Poff, N. LeRoy. 1997. Ecological theory and community restoration ecology. Restoration Ecology. Vol: 5. Pages 291-300.
Journal Article Parker, V. 1997. The scale of successional models and restoration objectives. Restoration Ecology. Vol: 5. Pages 301-306.
Journal Article White, Peter S.; Walker, Joan L. 1997. Approximating nature's variation: Selecting and using reference information in restoration ecology. Restoration Ecology. Vol: 5. Pages 338-349.