NCEAS Project 2117

Invasion biology: Toward a theory of impacts

  • Ingrid M. Parker

Manuscripts in Progress:

Impact: Toward a Framework for Understanding the Ecological Effects of Invaders - I.M. Parker, D. Simberloff, and W.M. Lonsdale, K. Goodell, M. Wonham, P.M. Kareiva, M.H. Williamson, B. von Holle, P.B. Moyle, J.E. Byers, and L. Goldwasser (pdf format)

A Global Database: The Key to Weighing On-The-Ground Invasive Species Impacts - Daniel Simberloff, Doria Gordon, Ron Hiebert, Mark Lonsdale, Robyn Draheim (pdf format)

Synergistic interactions of nonindigenous species: Invasional meltdown? - Daniel Simberloff and Betsy Von Holle (pdf format)

ActivityDatesFurther Information
Working Group23rd February—2nd March 1998Participant List  
Working Group10th—20th August 1998Participant List  
Working Group12th—15th February 1999Participant List  
Working Group15th—17th August 2000Participant List  

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Abstract

The past decade produced an impressive collection of books and edited volumes on "invasion biology" (Groves and Burdon 1986, Mooney and Drake 1986, Joenje et al. 1987, Drake et al. 1989, Hengeveld 1989). These volumes brought together case histories of a large number of invasive exotic organisms from all taxonomic groups, and invaded communities from all corners of the globe. In addition to compiling case histories, this explosion of volumes produced a forum for the development of general observations and mostly verbal theory about the patterns and dynamics of invasions. Commonly noted was the lack of rigorous, mechanistic, experimental examples or tests of theory. In the years since the symposia that spawned these initial volumes, researchers have gone beyond natural history and have begun investigating particular invasions in great biological detail and with more rigorous methods. In addition, in part as a response to the general recognition of exotic species invasions as one of our most pressing environmental problems (Hedgpeth 1993, Office of Technology Assessment 1993, Ruesink et al. 1995, Parker and Reichard 1997), both researchers and agencies have begun compiling databases of introduced species.

It is now time to regroup and figure out what we've learned. Because of the recent surge of empirical work, we are in a much better position now than we were a decade and a half ago to move beyond arm-waving, and the time is right for a new synthesis. Our research will focus on successful invasions, and ask whether it is possible to predict which invasions will have a large impact on communities and ecosystems?

TypeProducts of NCEAS Research
Presentations Bartuska, Ann. 2003. Briefing on project and workshop outcomes to NCSSF commission members, 4 June, 2003.
Presentations Byers, James E. 1998. How and when to protect native species from exotic invaders: Lessons from a predictive model, December 1998. Western Society of Naturalists (WSN). San Diego, CA.
Presentations Byers, James E.; Goldwasser, Lloyd. 1999. How and when to protect native species from exotic invaders: Lessons from a predictive model, August 1999. Ecological Society of America. Spokane, WA.
Journal Article Byers, James E.; Goldwasser, Lloyd. 2001. Exposing the mechanism and timing of impact of non-indigenous species on native species. Ecology. Vol: 82. Pages 1330-1343.
Journal Article Byers, James E.; Reichard, Sarah; Randall, John; Parker, Ingrid M.; Smith, Carey; Lonsdale, Mark; Atkinson, Ian A. E.; Seastedt, Timothy; Williamson, Mark; Chornesky, Elizabeth A.; Hayes, Deborah C. 2002. Directing research to reduce the impacts of nonindigenous species. Conservation Biology. Vol: 16(3). Pages 630-640.
Report or White Paper Chornesky, Elizabeth A. 2004. Funding proposals on invasive species in sustainable forestry. National Commission on Science for Sustainable Forestry.
Report or White Paper Chornesky, Elizabeth A. Workshop proceedings. National Commission on Science for Sustainable Forestry.
Presentations Goodell, Karen. 1999. The ecological impacts of invasive species. National Research Council, Committee on Sanitary and Phytosanitary Risk. Newport Beach, CA.
Book Chapter Goodell, Karen; Parker, Ingrid M.; Gilbert, Gregory S. 2000. Biological impacts of species invasions: Implications for policy makers. Edited by National Research Council of the United States. Incorporating Science, Economics, and Sociology in Developing Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards in International Trade. National Academy Press. Washington, DC. Pages 87-117.
Presentations Goodell, Karen; Wonham, Marjorie; Von Holle, Betsy; Parker, Ingrid M. 2000. Ecological impacts of invasive species: A meta-analysis . Annual meeting, Society for the Study of Evolution. Bloomington, IN.
Presentations Goodell, Karen; Wonham, Marjorie; Von Holle, Betsy; Parker, Ingrid M. 2000. Trophic and taxonomic patterns of impact of invasive species: A meta-analysis. Annual Meeting, Ecological Society of America. Snowbird, UT.
Journal Article Lok, Corie. 2001. Invasion moves at snails' pace. Nature (Science Update).
Report or White Paper Parker, Ingrid M. 1998. Progress report - Invasion biology: Toward a theory of impacts.
Presentations Parker, Ingrid M. 1999. How and when to protect native species from exotic invaders: Lessons from a predictive model. International Conference on Marine Bioinvasions, January 1999. Cambridge, MA.
Presentations Parker, Ingrid M. 1999. Impact: Assessing the ecological effects of invasive species. University of Copenhagen. Copenhagen.
Journal Article Parker, Ingrid M.; Simberloff, Daniel S.; Lonsdale, Mark; Goodell, Karen; Wonham, Marjorie; Kareiva, Peter; Williamson, Mark; Von Holle, Betsy; Moyle, Peter; Byers, James E.; Goldwasser, Lloyd. 1999. Impact: Toward a framework for understanding the ecological effects of invaders. Biological Invasions. Vol: 1. Pages 3-19.
Journal Article Simberloff, Daniel S.; Von Holle, Betsy. 1999. Positive interactions of nonindigenous species: Invasional meltdown?. Biological Invasions. Vol: 1. Pages 21-32.
Journal Article Simberloff, Daniel S.; Gordon, Doria; Hiebert, Ron; Lonsdale, Mark; Draheim, Robyn. In press. A global database: The key to weighing on-the-ground invasive species impacts. Natural Areas Journal.
Book Chapter Williams, Mark W. 1998. Measuring the impact of plant invaders in Britain. Edited by Starfinger, U.; Edwards, K.; Kowarik, I.; and Williamson, M.. Plant Invasions: Ecological Mechanisms and Human Responses. Backhuys. Leiden, Netherlands. Pages 57-68.
Presentations Williamson, Mark. 1998. Measuring and predicting the establishment and impact of invaders. Entomological Society of America Meeting. Las Vegas, NV.
Journal Article Williamson, Mark. 1998. Which mammals are pests?. Imprint. Vol: 25. Pages 26-30.
Report or White Paper Williamson, Mark; Perrins, J.; Fritter, A. 1999. Can novel weediness be predicted. Department of the Environment, Transport and Regions Research Report. Vol: 10. Pages 208-216.
Presentations Williamson, Mark. 1999. Can the impacts of invasive species be predicted?. First International Workshop on Weed Risk Assessment. Adelaide, Australia.
Report or White Paper Williamson, Mark. 1999. Examination of EC regulation of genetic modification in agriculture. HL Paper 11-II: House of Lords Select Committee on the European Communities Agriculture and Fisheries Subcommittee. Pages 213-230.
Presentations Williamson, Mark. 1999. Introductory paper. Workshop on the Economics of Invasives. York, England.
Journal Article Williamson, Mark. 1999. Invasions. Ecography. Vol: 22. Pages 5-12.
Presentations Williamson, Mark. 1999. Measuring, explaining and predicting invasions. Queensland Department of Natural Resources: Robert Wicks Research Centre. Brisbane, Australia.
Presentations Williamson, Mark. 1999. Quantifying, measuring, explaining and predicting invasions. Waite Research Campus, University of Adelaide. Adelaide, Australia.
Presentations Williamson, Mark. 1999. Quantifying the ecological and economic risks of invaders and GMOs. Plant Health in the New Global Trading Environment: Managing Exotic Insects, Weeds and Pathogens. Canberra, Australia.
Presentations Williamson, Mark. 1999. Where are we with GMOs?. Toomwoomba, Australia.
Book Chapter Williamson, Mark. 2001. Can the impacts of invasive species be predicted?. Edited by Groves, R. H.; Panetta, F. D.; Virtue J. G.. Weed Risk Assessment. CSIRO. Collingwood, Australia. Pages 20-33.
Presentations Wonham, Marjorie. 1999. Graduate student symposium, December 1999. UW Zoology Department.
Presentations Wonham, Marjorie; Goodell, Karen; Von Holle, Betsy; Parker, Ingrid M. 2000. Ecological and geographic patterns of impact of invasive species: A meta-analysis. Annual meeting, Ecological Society of America. Snowbird, UT.
Presentations Wonham, Marjorie. 2001. Ecology discussion group, January 2001. Zoology Department, University of Washington.
Presentations Wonham, Marjorie. 2001. Meta-analysis of biological invasions: Metrics of impact and issues of independence. Quantitative Seminar, 9 February 2001. UW School of Fisheries. Seattle, WA.