NCEAS Project 2305

Application of geostatistics in ecology (Sabbatical Fellow)

  • Andrew M. Liebhold

ActivityDatesFurther Information
Sabbatical Fellow5th June—31st August 1997Participant List  
Sabbatical Fellow29th June—27th August 1999Participant List  

Abstract

Geostatistics is a field of statistics that focuses on measuring and modeling variation through space and/or time. Geostatistical methods were originally developed for applications in the earth sciences. Recently there has been growing interest in the use of these methods for studying landscape-level ecological problems. While many ecologists have recognized the potential uses of geostsatistics in ecology, many of these applications have not occurred because there are no texts that are written in a way that ecologists can understand. Virtually all of the existing geoststatistics texts focus on geological problems. Thus, the purpose of the proposed Resident Fellow is to spend 3 months writing a text that introduces and explains geostatistics and how it can be applied to ecological problems. The text will rely heavily upon the use of examples for illustrating statistical procedures.

TypeProducts of NCEAS Research
Presentations Liebhold, Andrew M. 1997. Using geostatistics to model spatial patterns. Annual Meeting of the Entomological Society of America, 14-18 December 1997. Nashville, TN.
Presentations Liebhold, Andrew M.; Hohn, Michael. 1998. Geostatistical design of sampling plans in landscape-level pest management systems. Meeting of the International Congress of Ecology, August 1998. Florence, Italy.
Report or White Paper Liebhold, Andrew M. 1998. NCEAS interim report on the application of geostatistics in ecology. (Abstract) (Online version)
Presentations Liebhold, Andrew M. 1999. Use of geostatistical in natural resource evaluation. Department Seminar, 26 February 1999 . School of Natural Resources, University of Missouri. Columbia, MO.
Journal Article Liebhold, Andrew M.; Kamata, Naoto. 2000. Are population cycles and spatial synchrony a universal characteristic of forest insect populations. Population Ecology. Vol: 42. Pages 205-209.
Journal Article Liebhold, Andrew M.; Elkinton, Joseph; Williams, David G.; Muzika, Rose-Marie. 2000. What causes outbreaks of the gypsy moth in North America?. Population Ecology. Vol: 42. Pages 257-266.