NCEAS Project 9380

Ecological and evolutionary models for homeland security strategy

  • Raphael Sagarin

ActivityDatesFurther Information
Working Group28th—30th January 2005Participant List  
Working Group15th—18th June 2005Participant List  
Working Group9th—12th December 2005Participant List  

Members Only Area

Abstract
Biological organisms have developed a remarkable number of strategies to mitigate conflict with a broad range of adversaries in their environment. The diversity and success of these strategies, as illustrated by the millions of extant species on the Earth today, suggests that biological evolution may be a field rich with lessons for guiding societal conflict resolution and security strategy. The working group will bring leading security policy analysts together with evolutionary biologists, anthropologists and ecologists to draw on their expertise and identify evolutionary strategies that are applicable to security challenges faced by people, institutions and nations in the 21st century. These biological analogies will be developed into models of decision-making and behavior to explore alternative hypotheses related to strategies for security planning. The combination of biological and policy-oriented perspectives will allow both a rich theoretical discussion and a realistic assessment of the barriers to practical applications of theory.

TypeProducts of NCEAS Research
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael. 2006. Natural Security, November 2006. Western Society of Naturalists Annual Meeting. Seattle, WA.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael. 2007. Natural Security, May 2007. Human Behavior Evolution and Society Annual Conference. Williamsburg, VA.
Book Chapter Sagarin, Raphael. 2008. Introduction. A holistic view of national security . Edited by Sagarin, R.; Taylor, T.. Natural Defense: Darwinian Perspectives on Security in a Dangerous World. University of California Press.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael; Laipsom, Ellen. 2008. Natural Security, April 2008. AAAS Center for Science, Technology and Security Policy. Washington, DC.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael; Taylor, Terence; Johnson, Dominic. 2008. Natural Security, April 2008. Center for Strategic and International Studies. Washington, DC.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael. 2008. Natural Security, December 2008. Duke University, Program in Ecology. Durham, NC.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael. 2008. Natural Security, February 2008. The Regulator Bookshop. Durham, NC.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael; Taylor, Terence. 2008. Natural Security, May 2008. Stanford University Center for International Security and Cooperation. Stanford, CA.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael; Taylor, Terence. 2008. Natural Security, May 2008. IBM Almaden Laboratories, May 2008. Almaden, CA.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael; Taylor, Terence. 2008. Natural Security, May 2008. Google, Inc.. Mountain View, CA.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael; Taylor, Terence. 2008. Natural Security, November 2008. Triangle Center for Homeland Secuity Solutions. Durham, NC.
Presentations Sagarin, Raphael. 2008. Natural Security, October 2008. University of Arizona, School of Natural Resources. Tucson, AZ.
Book Chapter Sagarin, Raphael. 2008. Population models and countersurgency strategies. Natural security a Darwinian approach to a dangerous world. Pages 159-185.
Book Chapter Sagarin, Raphael. 2008. The origins of natural security. Edited by Sagarin, R.; Taylor, T.. Natural Defense: Darwinian Perspectives on Security in a Dangerous World. University of California Press.
Book Sagarin, Raphael. 2012. Learning from the Octopus: How Secrets from Nature Can Help Us Fight Terrorist Attacks, Natural Disasters and Disease. Basic Books, A Member of the Perseus Books Group. New York, NY.