North American Mammalian Paleofaunal Database: Trivia

North American Mammalian Paleofaunal Database: Trivia

These statistics are compiled from the latest version of the paleofaunal and systematic databases and are subject to revision.

Most diverse localities (taxa):

  1. Norden Bridge Quarry (72)
  2. Calf Creek (66)
  3. Valentine Railway Quarries (60)
  4. Davis Ranch (58)
  5. Cochrane 2 (57)
  6. Cumberland Cave (57)
  7. Elk Creek (140 m) (52)
  8. Gidley Quarry (52)
  9. Lysite (52)
  10. Pipestone Springs (52)
  11. Santee (52)
Note: count is of distinct taxa, meaning named species plus genera with no identified species at this locality.
Most fossiliferous counties (localities):

  1. Park Co., Wyoming (319)
  2. Sioux Co., Nebraska (216)
  3. San Diego Co., California (193)
  4. Shannon Co., South Dakota (167)
  5. Riverside Co., California (164)
  6. Garfield Co., Colorado (153)
  7. San Bernardino Co., California (129)
  8. Uinta Co., Wyoming (127)
  9. Cherry Co., Nebraska (118)
  10. Sweetwater Co., Wyoming (116)
Most diverse genera (valid species):

  1. Spermophilus (40)
  2. Sorex (24)
  3. Peromyscus (20)
  4. Equus (18)
  5. Merychippus (17)
  6. Neotoma (17)
  7. Cupidinimus (16)
  8. Hyopsodus (16)
  9. Perognathus (16)
  10. Entoptychus (14)
  11. Miacis (14)
  12. Proheteromys (14)
Most over-used genera (invalid genus-species combinations):

  1. Canis (38)
  2. Mioclaenus (31)
  3. Paramys (30)
  4. Pliohippus (30)
  5. Felis (28)
  6. Mesohippus (28)
  7. Promerycochoerus (28)
  8. Citellus (27)
  9. Bison (24)
  10. Eporeodon (24)
  11. Gomphotherium (24)
  12. Procamelus (24)
Most over-named species (junior synonyms):

  1. Uintatherium anceps (36)
  2. Merycochoerus superbus (28)
  3. Gomphotherium obscurum (25)
  4. Leptauchenia decora (24)
  5. Gomphotherium willistoni (21)
  6. Orohippus pumilus (21)
  7. Bootherium bombifrons (20)
  8. Mammuthus columbi (18)
  9. Merycoidodon bullatus (18)
  10. Leptauchenia major (16)
Note: assorted invalid combinations involving the same synonymous species name are counted separately.
Most taxonomically debated species (changes of status):

  1. Hyopotamus brachyrhynchus Osborn & Wortman = Elomeryx armatus (10)
  2. Canis gregarius Cope = Hesperocyon gregarius (11)
  3. Hyopotamus americanus Leidy = Aepinacodon americanus (11)
  4. Machaerodus floridanus Leidy = Smilodon fatalis (11)
  5. Smilodon gracilis Cope (11)
  6. Equus idahoensis Merriam (10)
  7. Ancodus rostratus Scott = Bothriodon rostratus (9)
  8. Pelycodus angulatus Cope = Cantius angulatus(9)
Note: many names are tied at 8 changes each.
Most common species (localities):

  1. Ectocion osbornianus (167)
  2. Phenacodus intermedius (112)
  3. Phenacodus vortmani (107)
  4. Hesperocyon gregarius (101)
  5. Hyracotherium grangeri (96)
  6. Viverravus acutus (90)
  7. Haplomylus speirianus (87)
  8. Paramys copei (83)
  9. Didymictis protenus (81)
  10. Hyopsodus paulus (80)
Note: many of these species are Wasatchian (early Eocene).
Longest-ranging species (Cenozoic only):

  1. Centetodon magnus (18.0 my)
  2. Palaeogale sectoria (15.5 my)
  3. Copedelphys innominata (13.1 my)
  4. Hesperocyon gregarius (13.1 my)
  5. Hypolagus vetus (11.8 my)
  6. Parvericius montanus (11.8 my)
  7. Domnina gradata (10.8 my)
  8. Peratherium comstocki (10.7 my)
  9. Herpetotherium knighti (10.6 my)
  10. Paramys copei (10.4 my)
Note: many of these species are small marsupials, rodents, or insectivorans.
Biggest species (estimated from m1 or m2 size):

  1. Mammuthus columbi (8,700 kg)
  2. Brontops dispar (5,100 kg)
  3. Cuvieronius tropicus (4,600 kg)
  4. Gomphotherium willistoni (4,200 kg)
  5. Aphelops mutilus (3,700 kg)
  6. Rhynchotherium praecursor (3,700 kg)
  7. Archaeotherium trippensis (3,400 kg)
  8. Mammut raki (3,400 kg)
  9. Mammut americanum (3,300 kg)
  10. Gomphotherium obscurum (3,200 kg)
Notes: regression equations perform poorly for very large species, and some of these estimates are likely to be too high. Proboscidean sizes are estimated from m2, not m1.
Smallest species (estimated from m1 size):

  1. Batodonoides vanhouteni (1.3 g)
  2. Spalacotheridium noblei (2.6 g)
  3. Leptodontomys russelli (2.8 g)
  4. Cupidinimus eurekensis (3.0 g)
  5. Leptodontomys quartzi (3.1 g)
  6. Batodonoides powayensis (3.2 g)
  7. Sorex meltoni (3.5 g)
  8. Perognathus trojectioansrum (3.7 g)
  9. Heliscomys ostranderi (4.0 g)
  10. Spalacolestes cretulablatta (4.1 g)
Most productive taxonomists (species named/synonymized):

  1. E. D. Cope (452.5/20)
  2. W. D. Matthew (214.5/103)
  3. O. C. Marsh (205/2)
  4. B. Lander (2/168.5)
  5. C. L. Gazin (122.5/46)
  6. J. Leidy (152.5/9)
  7. G. G. Simpson (108/40.5)
  8. C. W. Hibbard (123.5/20)
  9. H. F. Osborn (115/24.5)
  10. C. Frick (119.5/15)
Note: authors receive half-credit for co-authored actions. Taxonomic contributions of Lander and Frick each appeared mostly in just one publication.
Most productive faunal reviewers (lists published):

  1. A. J. Kihm (206)
  2. K. D. Rose (140.5)
  3. J. R. Macdonald (121)
  4. A. F. Pajak (121)
  5. G. F. Gunnell (116.5)
  6. J. A. Lillegraven (69)
  7. T. S. Kelly (64.5)
  8. M. F. Skinner (62.5)
  9. G. T. James (61)
  10. E. H. Lindsay (60)
  11. M. R. Voorhies (60)
Notes: authors receive half-credit for co-authored lists. Most of Kihm's lists are from an unpublished Ph.D. thesis. Most of Skinner's "lists" are locality descriptions with identifications provided by other authors.
Most papers by an author:

  1. C. W. Hibbard (77)
  2. C. Stock (50)
  3. W. W. Korth (48)
  4. P. D. Gingerich (43)
  5. S. G. Lucas (40)
  6. R. C. Fox (39)
  7. G. G. Simpson (37)
  8. E. H. Barbour (36)
  9. R. W. Wilson (36)
  10. C. L. Gazin (34)
Note: only senior authors are counted. Nineteenth-century authors (including Matthew) are excluded.
Most papers per journal:

  1. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology (227)
  2. Journal of Paleontology (201)
  3. American Museum Novitates (107)
  4. American Journal of Science (103)
  5. Journal of Mammalogy (97)
  6. Annals of Carnegie Museum (92)
  7. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History (76)
  8. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology, University of Michigan (55)
  9. Carnegie Institution of Washington Publications (54)
  10. University of Wyoming Contributions in Geology/Rocky Mountain Geology (43)
Note: totals for JVP include numerous abstracts.