Analysis of stressors and ecosystem services to enhance restoration effectiveness in Great Lakes

Great Lakes cumulative stress map

This study merged high-resolution spatial analyses of environmental stressors with mapping of ecosystem services for all five Great Lakes. Current restoration efforts have targeted high-stress sites almost exclusively, but generally without knowledge of the full range of stressors affecting these locations or differences among sites in service provisioning. An environmental stress map was developed by a binational team of researchers from academia and environmental organizations, known as the Great Lakes Environmental Assessment and Mapping (GLEAM) project. Results demonstrate that joint spatial analysis of stressors and ecosystem services can provide a critical foundation for maximizing social and ecological benefits from restoration investments.

Joint analysis of stressors and ecosystem services to enhance restoration effectiveness
J. David Allan, Peter B. McIntyre, Sigrid D. P. Smith, Benjamin S. Halpern, Gregory L. Boyer, Andy Buchsbaum, G. A. Burton, Jr., Linda M. Campbell, W. Lindsay Chadderton, Jan J. H. Ciborowski, Patrick J. Doran, Tim Eder, Dana M. Infantl, Lucinda B. Johnson, Christine A. Joseph, Adrienne L. Marino, Alexander Prusevich, Jennifer G. Read, Joan B. Rose, Edward S. Rutherford, Scott P. Sowa, and Alan D. Steinman
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, December 17, 2012 (online)

UCSB press release
Great Lakes Environmental Assessment and Mapping (GLEAM) Project

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Posted on December 18, 2012