NCEAS Project 12164

Efficient wildlife disease control: From social network self-organization to optimal vaccination

  • Peter D. Walsh

ActivityDatesFurther Information
Working Group12th—23rd February 2008Participant List  
Working Group21st—25th July 2008Participant List  
Working Group17th—20th February 2009Participant List  
Working Group28th September—3rd October 2009Participant List  

Abstract
As large vertebrates are restricted to ever smaller populations, the threat posed by infectious disease grows. This multidisciplinary working group will investigate how information on social network connectivity can be used to make wildlife disease control programs more efficient. Using primates as a model system, we will build from studies on the way in which memory-based cognitive skills drive social network self-organization to the modeling of optimal disease control. Our modeling will be strongly data-based, using large datasets on ranging and disease prevalence/mortality from gorillas, chimpanzees and four monkey species to parameterize and validate agent-based simulation models. The datasets are from primate species that both suffer disease spillover from humans (e.g. measles, yaws, gut parasites) and act as reservoir or intermediate hosts for viruses that are of high public health (HIV, yellow fever) or bioterror (anthrax, Ebola) importance. The group’s research will be focused on three overlapping topics. First, we will investigate how cognitive skills influence social network self-organization and interact with landscape processes such as habit degradation and hunting to determine patterns of disease emergence. Second, we will evaluate both generic strategies for controlling disease in protected areas and detailed case studies of optimal disease control in specific systems, including a special focus on controlling the impact of Ebola, which has killed about one third of the world’s protected area gorilla population over the last 15 years. Third, the group will perform cost-benefit analyses to evaluate the cost-effectiveness and feasibility of vaccination relative to other conservation strategies, as well as make recommendations on which steps need to be taken to streamline the movement of vaccines and treatments from laboratory development to field implementation. Working group products will include both basic research on the mechanisms of disease network self-organization and more applied work on optimal disease control in real systems. A large body of primary and derived data products will be deposited in publicly accessible databases. The group has excellent diversity and balance in terms of the scientific discipline, career stage, gender, and geographic origin of its participants.

TypeProducts of NCEAS Research
Dissertation or Thesis Benavides, Julio. 2011. Ecological of infectious diseases in social primates. University of Montpellier, France.
Journal Article Benavides, Julio; Walsh, Peter D.; Meyers, Lauren; Raymond, Michel; Caillaud, Damien. 2012. Transmission of infectious diseases en route to habitat hotspots. PLoS ONE. Vol: 7(2). Pages e31290-e31290. (Online version)
Presentations Boyer, Denis. 2009. Animal movement and some ecological implications. Ecological Complexity Seminar, 2009. Center for Complexity Sciences, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Mexico.
Presentations Boyer, Denis. 2009. Animal movement and some ecological implications. Ecological Complexity Seminar, Center for Complexity Sciences, 2009. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Mexico.
Presentations Boyer, Denis. 2009. Statistical physics of animal displacements. XI Latin American Worshop on Nonlinear Phenomena, 2009. Búzios, Brasil.
Journal Article Boyer, Denis; Walsh, Peter D. 2010. Modelling the mobility of living organisms in heterogeneous landscapes: Does memory improve foraging success?. Vol: 368. Pages 5645-5659. (Online version)
Presentations Boyer, Denis. 2010. Power-law distributions in the movement patterns of living organisms. Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico.
Presentations Boyer, Denis. 2010. Power-laws in animal movement patterns. Conference on Nonlinear Dynamics and Complex Systems, 2010.
Presentations Boyer, Denis. 2010. Statistical-physical description of animal displacements. Seminar of the Theoretical Physics Department, 2010. Université de Toulouse. France.
Presentations Boyer, Denis. 2010. The movement of living organisms and statistical physics. Seminar of the Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, 2010. Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla. Mexico.
Presentations Boyer, Denis. 2011. Living organisms on the move: a perspective from complex systems. Seminar of the Masters on Nonlinear dynamics and Complex Systems, 2011. Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México. Mexico.
Presentations Boyer, Denis. 2011. Space use by animals: Memory, home ranges and scaling laws. Ecological Complexity Seminar, Center for Complexity Sciences, 2011. Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. Mexico.
Journal Article Boyer, Denis; Crofoot, Margaret C.; Walsh, Peter D. 2012. Non-random walks in monkeys and humans. Journal of the Royal Society Interface. Vol: 9(70). Pages 842-847. (Online version)
Presentations Caillaud, Damien. 2010. Integrating feeding ecology and network theory to understand the transmission of infectious diseases in social primates. Harvard University Seminar, 2010. Harvard Universidad. Cambridge, USA.
Journal Article Caillaud, Damien; Crofoot, Margaret C.; Scarpino, Samuel V.; Jansen, Patrick A.; Garzon-Lopez, Carol X.; Winkelhagen, Annemarie J. S.; Bohlman, Stephanie A.; Walsh, Peter D. 2010. Modeling the spatial distribution and fruiting pattern of a key tree species in a neotropical forest: Methodology and potential applications. Vol: 5(11). Pages e15002.
Presentations Caillaud, Damien. 2010. Network and behavioral models for disease dynamics and control. Disease in Motion Conference, Princeton University 2010. Princeton University. Princeton, USA.
Presentations Caillaud, Damien. 2010. Ranging patterns in great apes: Roles of food resource distribution, spatial memory and inter-group feeding competition. Boyd Orr Seminar, University of Glasgow, 2010. University of Glasgow. Glasgow, UK.
Presentations Caillaud, Damien. 2010. Using Capture-Mark-Recapture to estimate gorilla susceptibility to Ebola virus. Boyd Orr Seminar, University of Glasgow, 2010. University of Glasgow. Glasgow, UK.
Presentations Crofoot, Margaret C. 2010. No need for violence: Memory-based foraging and conspecific resource depletion can explain primate "war zones". 23rd Congress of the International Primatological Society, 2010. Kyoto, Japan.
Presentations Crofoot, Margaret C. 2010. No need for violence: Memory-based foraging and conspecific resource depletion can explain primate "war zones". 79th Meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists, 2010.
Journal Article Ryan, Sadie J.; Walsh, Peter D. 2011. Consequences of non-intervention for infectious disease in African Great Apes. PLoS ONE. Vol: 6(12). Pages e29030-e29030. (Online version)
Data Set Ryan, Sadie J. 2012. Recovery simulations for infectious diseases in African Great Apes. (Online version)
Presentations Salvador, Liliana. 2008. Animal movement and foraging strategies. PhD Program in Computational Biology Annual Meeting, 2008. Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia. Portugal.
Presentations Salvador, Liliana. 2008. Foraging decisions and animal grouping patterns. Faculdade de Ciencias Seminar, 2008. Universidade de Lisboa. Portugal.
Presentations Salvador, Liliana. 2008. Foraging strategies and primate grouping patterns: “Not all who wander are lost”. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Department, 2008. Princeton University. Princeton, USA.
Dissertation or Thesis Salvador, Liliana. 2011. The ecological and evolutionary analysis of foraging animal movement. Universidade de Lisboa, Portugal.
Journal Article Walsh, Peter D.; Boyer, Denis; Crofoot, Margaret C. 2010. Correspondence: Monkey and cell-phone-user mobilities scale similarly. Vol: 6. Pages 929-930. (Online version)