Predicting grassland community responses to fertilization: Exploring the role of clonality and other species traits

Principal Investigators:

Katherine L. Gross

Nutrient enrichment is predicted to be one of the top three drivers of biodiversity loss this century (Sala et al. 2000). It is therefore critical to understand how biodiversity will respond to elevated nutrient levels in different ecosystems, including what species or functional groups will come to dominate in high fertility environments and why. In grasslands, high fertility sites are often dominated by clonal species. The observation that declining or hump-shaped diversity-productivity relationships occur more frequently when clonal species are... more

Participants and Meetings

A group photo is coming soon.
ActivityDatesFurther Information
Sabbatical Fellow1st November 2010—31st March 2011Participant List  
Meeting3rd—5th November 2010Participant List  

Participant Contact Information

Katherine L. Grosskgross@kbs.msu.eduMichigan State University
Elsa E. Clelandecleland@ucsd.eduUniversity of California, San Diego
Scott L. Collinsscollins@sevilleta.unm.eduUniversity of New Mexico
Laura Goughgough@uta.eduUniversity of Texas, Arlington
Katharine N. Sudingsuding@berkeley.eduUniversity of California, Irvine

Products: Publications, Reports, Datasets, Presentations, Visualizations

TypeProduct of NCEAS Research
Journal Article Gough, Laura; Gross, Katherine L.; Cleland, Elsa E.; Clark, Christopher M.; Collins, Scott L.; Fargione, Joseph E.; Pennings, Steven C.; Suding, Katharine N. 2012. Incorporating clonal growth form clarifies the role of plant height in response to nitrogen addition. Oecologia. Vol: 169. Pages 1053-1062. (Online version)
"Predicting grassland community responses to fertilization: Exploring the role of clonality and other species traits" is project ID: 12558